Oops, I did it again!

Working on free software projects isn’t easy. Just because you’re giving away your work for anyone to use doesn’t mean that anyone is going to take it, no questions asked. Take my MediaWiki work as an example. I am being paid for the work, but it is freely licensed and I’m learning about the standards of quality that the community has formed around the code. Frankly, before becoming involved in such a serious PHP-based project, I didn’t have a very high opinion of PHP. Even Rasmus (creator of PHP) doesn’t seem to live in a pure php world and, as a result, thinks of systems where PHP is merely the web frontend instead of almost the entire system. So working with others who have been neck-deep in PHP for years, building one of the top-10 sites on the net entirely in PHP, and gaining intimate familiarity with the quirks of PHP, has been a wonderful experience. But MediaWiki isn’t the only free software project I’m involved in. I also contribute to Emacs occasionally. (For those not so familar with Emacs vs Vi, let’s just say this is like the social situation between Republicans and the Democrats or the Roman Catholics and Southern Baptists: You live next door to them, but you know they’re going to hell.) And it is my most recent commits to Emacs that have gained me noteriety. Yesterday, I was catching up on some blog reading (Planet Emacs, thankyouverymuch) and came across a nifty use of loccur.el. But it used defadvice instead of a hook (and hooks are better — no this is different than emacs vs vi, I swear). I looked at the code and thought, “Hey, I can make a tiny little contribution to Emacs here!” So I made a couple of small changes. Little did I know what a problem that was going to be. Óscar Fuentes used my commit message as an example of how not to write a commit message. This was not the first time I’ve been so honored. Three weeks ago, I made a mistake committing to the bzr repository for emacs and was again used as an example for the Emacs-devel community of how not to make a commit. There are two reasons I’m such a stellar example for the other Emacs developers. First, I’ve been using bzr for a couple of years while working on the iHRIS Suite. This experience (2 years more than most Emacs developers) naturally made me think I had things under control. So I didn’t bother reading over Bzr for Emacs Devs. Second, Emacs recently switched its source-control system (after much debate and some effort on speed the bzr side) from the ancient, worn, CVS to bzr. So people are still adapting their work flow. I just happened to make some commits that were particularly egregious and ended up being great examples of what people should avoid. So, yes, Free Software is a great thing, but that doesn’t mean the developers don’t take it seriously. And being reprimanded in public isn’t the most pleasent experience. But at least I can blog about it!

One thought on “Oops, I did it again!”

  1. Now I feel better 😉

    I read the complaint about how not to do it and saw the commit was about an isearch-update hook. That rang a bell! Didn’t I recently read someone having to use advice because there was no apropriate hook for isearch? I’ve got to tell that guy it is on the way! But I could not remember where I read it and I had this at the back of my head for hours! The emms posting, loccurr I downloaded and testet a few minutes! Thank you. -Memnon

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